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blueboxtraveller:

Moments that made me cry uncontrollably: [3/4]

↳ Vincent van Gogh seeing the future success of his work

(via nowhere-inparticular)

#doctor who   #tv  

silversora:

If a dead ancestor doesn’t appear in the sky to stop me, it can’t be that bad of a decision

(via dangerouslyunhipteddy)

gyarados:

People who say “the customer is always right” have clearly never had a conversation with the customer

(via halpertjames)

colleenclarkart:

I made a comic with pretty much the same punchline as this other comic I made maybe no one will notice

colleenclarkart:

I made a comic with pretty much the same punchline as this other comic I made maybe no one will notice

(via turnipss)

deisegal:

caesaretluna:

"nope"

- everyone

 

image

(via pixolith)

What you missed on 4x02 of Game of Thrones

But what made the [How I Met Your Mother] pilot pop, what made it seem smart and nuanced and surprisingly philosophical, was the closing moment when a “cute guy meets cute girl” story concluded with the narrator, the man telling the story of How He Met Your Mother, saying that this cute girl was not the mother. This was how he met “Aunt Robin.” He’d get to the mother later.

This was a move legitimately subversive of a rule that television knows all too well: The answer to “will they or won’t they?” is always “they will,” and that’s why we’re all here. Knowing that Ted did not wind up with Robin, but wound up with someone else — but still remained close enough to Robin that his kids addressed her as “Aunt Robin” — said something different. It said, “You know what? They won’t. But don’t leave yet.” It said that there is value in stories about things that don’t work out, and value in romances that end. Everyone matters, everything is important, everything fits together and makes a whole life.

The series finale revealed that to the degree this is what the show seemed to be saying, the joke was on you. It was a nine-year-long con (as James Poniewozik put it) that fooled you into thinking it wasn’t running on an engine of total cliche when — psych! — it totally was. Because it turned out that of course Ted wasn’t really saying everything matters, that your whole life is important, that you can still love people even if you don’t end up with them, that the good pieces and the bad pieces and the ups and the downs were all part of the story of how you wound up in the right place.

No, he was telling this whole story because he was in denial, and he spoke about the sad and happy moments of his life for nine seasons so that his teenage children could tell him to get over their dead mother and go after their aunt. (As the teenage children of widowed parents always do in this blithe, go-get-‘em-tiger kind of way, in Bizarro World.)

And so he did. He went and gave himself to Robin, whom he’d loved all along. She doesn’t matter because they’d loved each other and that always means something; she matters because he’s still in love with her and now they can kiss. She never wanted kids, but apparently she now wants to be a stepparent to Ted’s kids, something something mumble mumble what was this character about again?

So it was all a trick — they will after all! The end.

That’s not to even mention the other things that went wrong in the finale: The marriage of Robin and Barney, which the show spent its entire final season on, was dismissed with a sort of hand-wave of “she traveled a lot and it didn’t work out” so that Robin would be free for Ted’s destiny to be fulfilled later. The embrace of Barney as a selfish jerk seemed to be the part of its original DNA to which the show would remain true, but then — psych! — he had a baby with a woman he barely knew and we never saw, and it made him nice and domesticated. Neil Patrick Harris played the heck out of the scene where Barney falls in love with the baby, but it still didn’t make any kind of sense, nor did it resonate with anything else that had happened in the show up to that point.

Perhaps worst of all, the fine work of Cristin Milioti as the mother across the final season was wasted as it turned out she was, within the show’s structure, merely a piece of the great love story of Ted and Robin, and died of Unspecified Sad Hospital-Bed-itis so that their romantic balcony scene could happen.

"It’s the journey and not the destination" is usually the right way to look at series finales, a disturbing number of which don’t stick the landing. The problem with this one in particular is that the relationship between the journey and the destination was the show’s animating principle. That Ted was on a journey that was not about Robin was the first interesting thing the show ever said.

Linda Holmes, “Oh, ‘Mother’: An Awful End To A Long Love Story” (via lesserjoke)

(via mahfr)

kayleyhyde:

We all know that feeling, vending machine

kayleyhyde:

We all know that feeling, vending machine

(via nowhere-inparticular)

He was my friend.

(Source: leaveatrail, via aryastarks)

#GOT   #tv  

it’s funny how, as a child, I’ve always been told to stand up for what I think is right and to voice my opinion, because the older I get, the more my sense of justice and my opinions are becoming my main source of problem

sempiternalink:

I can’t believe drawing a black line across my eyelids makes me feel 10x prettier.

(via dashingpirate)

Chloe in 2x06, Not I

(Source: nymsands, via mahfr)

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